Volume 9

Non-auditory Effects of Noise in the Classroom: Teachers

In the last edition of Canadian Audiologist Pam wrote how high noise levels in classrooms have not improved much over the years. However, there are other overlooked ways in which high noise levels impact student and teacher health and well-being at school.

Have We Made Any Progress on Classroom Noise Levels?

It seems as though educational audiologists have been talking about noise levels in classrooms for decades, but have we made any progress in reducing them?

From Clinic to Classroom: Are Recommendations Lost in Translation?

A crucial part of any audiological assessment is the provision of recommendations to support student learning. While many of our recommendations have a solid theoretical foundation, research on their efficacy is sometimes scant or contradictory.

Volume 8

The Roots of Educational Audiology in Ontario: An Interview with Carolyne Edwards

Pam Millett takes a trip down memory lane with Carolyne Edwards to talk about the early days of educational audiology in Ontario and answer some of questions about the evolution of educational audiology over the years.

Back to School During a Pandemic (still): Lessons Learned

We have now all survived a full year of school during a pandemic – what have we learned? What lessons can we take forward into the next year of uncertainty, given that Ministries of Education across Canada have released back-to-school plans which assume in-person learning?

Collaborating for Student Success: Teachers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

As audiologists and speech-language pathologists, support and collaboration with Teachers of the Deaf is vital to ensure the hard work we do to identify children early and give them a solid foundation for communication and academic success does not fall apart due to a lack of school services.

Are Students Still “Alone in the Mainstream”?

In 2004, Gina Oliva, published the book Alone in the Mainstream: A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School and posits that mainstreaming is not always positive and that there are significant downsides concerning social relationships and identity – is this still true today?

Collaborating for Effective HAT Choices

Classrooms are dynamic listening environments and we need to continually evaluate whether we have appropriately matched the needs of the student with the recommended technology (and pivot when necessary).

Volume 7

“June Tired”: Back to School During A Pandemic

In the spring, in the article Online Learning Success for Students with Hearing Loss, Pam talked about what online learning should look like for our students; In this issue she’s going to share what in-class and online learning is looking like this year.

Fallacy of “The Teacher Voice”

This issue’s Audiology in the Classrooms is by Dr. Krista Yuskow of the Edmonton Public Schools as an educational audiologist. Of her many interests Krista focuses on the relationship between hearing loss and self-determination.