Volume 10

Is Hearing Loss in Older Adults Predictive of Later Development of Dementia and Does Hearing Care Modify Dementia Risk?

This paper provides an overview of the rapidly expanding research evidence-base concerning connections between hearing and cognition. It underscores the importance of distinguishing between measures to evaluate performance on various domains of cognition in healthy older adults versus measures to screen for dementia and emphasizes that correlation does not prove causation.

Volume 9

I Only Knew 10% of the People that I Met at the CAA Conference!

I wouldn’t say that I am old and I still have at least another decade in the field, but for the first time, at the CAA annual conference in Niagara Falls, Ontario, I only knew a very small fraction of those who attended.  And this is a good thing.  On one hand this suggests that…

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

I am 18 months behind in my reading! So, I fully admit that while I am up to date, and being a peer reviewer for many journals, am even better than up to date in many areas of audiology, my reading on the subject area of “hidden hearing loss” has lagged. My latest understanding of…

The meaning of Susan Scollie [ska:li]

The verb “to Scollie” is defined in the Dictionary of Seewald Language (DSL) as “to get things done” as in ‘will you please Scollie this article for me?’. The implication is that Susan Scollie will correct any errors in the article and do it quickly without hesitation. The etymology is not clear but it is…

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

Non-auditory Effects of Lower-Level Environmental Noise This issue of CanadianAudiologist.ca is about audiology and also not about audiology. The topic of how lower levels of environmental noise affect the body has been formally studied since 1946, yet has not shown anything definitive about long-term effects related to sleep disruption, annoyance, or overall stress. The following…

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

In 2020, Saunders and her colleagues published a really neat report in Ear and Hearing, with a rather lengthy title “Electronic health records as a platform for audiological research: data validity, patient characteristics and hearing-aid use persistence among 731,213 US Veterans.”1  They were interested in developing a novel research technique by which the follow-up behaviours…

Message from the Editor

This editorial begins with a common clinical occurrence: “A 63-year-old woman scheduled an appointment for an audiological evaluation because she has observed hearing difficulty in noisy environments…. The audiological exam revealed normal hearing sensitivity through 4000 Hz, dropping to a mild sensorineural hearing loss at 6000-8000 Hz bilaterally. Word recognition ability was excellent bilaterally. She…

Volume 8

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

How We Became “Unethical” Modern policies are often based on long-standing and sometimes archaic points of view or funding practices. For example, in audiology, many of the services currently provided are based on how these services were paid for in the past. It was not unusual to find an audiology practice specializing in one area…

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

I recall as a student discussing the softest sound that can perforate an eardrum. We had learned all about the quietest sound across the frequency range that was still audible, but little was mentioned on the other end of the scale, above the pain threshold.  I recall sitting down in a bar with my classmates, trying…

Celebrating Dr. Nina Kraus

Dr. Nina Kraus is being celebrated in this special issue of CanadianAudiologist.  To be fair, Nina’s work is being feted, but it is almost impossible to separate Nina from her work.  Nina’s passion is boundless, and it would be naïve to think that we can separate Nina from her work, or for that matter, from…