News

Following are a selection of interesting news items from our field. This section will be updated on a continuous basis so check back often in between issues, to see what is new.

How the Brain Balances Hearing Between Our Ears

Source: ScienceDaily

Researchers have answered the longstanding question of how the brain balances hearing between our ears, which is essential for localizing sound, hearing in noisy conditions and for protection from noise damage.

Breakthrough in Tinnitus Research Could Lead to Testable Model

Source: ScienceDaily

A major breakthrough has been made that provides new insights into how tinnitus, and the often co-occurring hyperacusis, might develop and be sustained. Tinnitus is largely a mystery, a phantom sound heard in the absence of actual sound. Tinnitus patients "hear" ringing, buzzing or hissing in their ears much like an amputee might "feel" pain in a missing limb. It is a symptom, not a disease, and though exposure to loud noise may cause it, some cases have no apparent trigger.

Ears May Have Special Pain Pathway, Study Finds

Source: Hearing Review

Research scientists at Northwestern University have discovered that ears have a special pain pathway that serves as a warning system, sending signals to the brain to help protect us against damaging noise.

Dangerous Decibels and Exercise Classes

Source: Healthy Hearing

Are you committed to getting healthy this spring? Maybe two or three times a week, you enthusiastically attend Zumba and the resulting cardio workout makes you feel fantastic. But what if that class actually is detrimental to your hearing?

Learning Music as a Child Protects Brain’s Speech and Auditory Functions as You Age, Study Finds

Source: National Post

Learning music at a young age has been linked to improved speech and auditory function in older adults in a new study suggesting that the training does far more than merely teaching music.

Local Canadian Hard of Hearing Association Installs Earplug Vending Machine at Concert Venue

Source: CBC News

Have you bought tickets for an upcoming concert at Mile One Centre? The local chapter of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association hopes you'll spend one more dollar on what might be a more important long-term investment — earplugs.

There's a new vending machine just inside the stadium entrance stocked with foam noise blockers.

Give Smart: Canadian Hearing Society Toronto

Source: Toronto Star

One in four Canadian adults has some form of hearing loss, and the Canadian Hearing Society (CHS) is a "multi-service charity for deaf, hard of hearing, culturally deaf and oral deaf individuals" that has been removing communication barriers for these individuals for the past 75 years.

How We Hear Distance: Echoes are essential for humans to perceive how far away a sound is

Source: ScienceDaily

Mammals are good at figuring out which direction a sound is coming from, whether it's a predator breathing down our necks or a baby crying for its mother. But how we judge how far away that sound is was a mystery until now. Researchers report that echoes and fluctuations in volume are the cues we use to figure the distance between us and the source of a noise.

Whole Foods and Your Hearing Health

Source: Healthy Hearing

When we tuck in for our favorite meal of the day – whether it’s breakfast, lunch, dinner or the occasional midnight snack – we don’t often think about how the food we put into our mouths, chew and digest affects our body.

Christopher Spankovich, Au.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., CCC-A and research assistant professor at the University of Florida spends his time studying dietary patterns in order to figure out how nutrients work together in the auditory system.

Noise-induced hearing loss: are you at risk?

Source: Healthy Hearing

Tractors. Pneumatic percussion drills. Jackhammers. Loud music. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC,) every day up to 4 million people are subjected to damaging noise as a routine part of their jobs. Unfortunately that translates to a lot of people at a high risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). New research, however, is shedding light on exactly what physiological changes occur during NIHL, specifically to the hearing parts of the brain, in an effort to create new prevention and treatment options.