Volume 6

“I Am Not a Fan of Equality!”

On the surface this appears to fly in the face of mother and apple pie. But having said this, I am a fan of “equity.” The idea of treating all people the same comes with a list of requirements that include “all people require the same support.” It would be unequal to provide someone with…

Volume 5

Directions

It has long been a theorem that knowledge runs from the university to the clinic, in a seemingly unidirectional manner. This was certainly true of the beginnings of our field and still was when I was in school during the 1970s and early 1980s. But more and more, this theorem of directionality is being called…

Where Research Meets the Clinic

Welcome to this issue of Canadian Audiologist. This issue is packed with informative articles, many of which are written so clearly and are so applicable to our clients that they can simply be printed off and given to them. Pam Millett has written a wonderful piece entitled Getting students ready for “back to school.” This…

Do We Really Care Whether our Clients Have Cochlear Synaptopathy?

In the last several issues Canadian Audiologist has had articles on the topic of cochlear synaptopathy: Adam Sheppard in issue 6, 2017, Colleen LePrell in issue 2, 2018, and in this issue, Martin Pienkowski in “Science Matters,” and Alfarghal Mohamad. Neurological measures such as wave I amplitude, and the SP/AP ratio have been proposed as…

The More We Change, The More We Stay the Same

I recall doing an ABR in 1980 with a very large 4-channel machine with a lot of flashing lights (it may have had a crank on it?) but only rarely have I done an ABR or other form of evoked testing since then. My areas of interest have always been the effects of music and…

Heading Back to the Grindstone

Audiology is a relatively new profession, seeing its growth after WWII. And like any new profession there are both downsides and upsides- the limits of what we do, and can do are not written in stone, but alas, recognition and statutory recognition and protection of our roles and responsibilities are underdeveloped. I recall when I…

Volume 4

Hidden Hearing Loss and Other Neat Stuff

I think that one of the most frustrating things that can happen in the clinic is to have a client with complaints of not being able to hear well in noise as their friends, only to find a normal audiogram. In the 1980s and 1990s, I would just look at them at tell them that…

Message from the Editor-in-Chief

We are a field of people and not just technologies. I have been in this field for well over 35 years now and the most important things that I fondly remember are the people and the relationships that were built. Yes, I remember the technological advances even though the 1980s only saw the development of…

Maybe Bluetooth Should be Called Blacktooth?

The Cover Feature of this issue of Canadian Audiologist is about smartphone control of hearing aids. Of course, this has been made possible by the invention of the 1930s actress Hedy Lamar who held the first patent for wireless transmission; which was later to be named Bluetooth, after an 10th century king of Denmark and…

OTC and Observations on the Humes et al Study

Reprinted from HEARINGREVIEW.COM 1 FEBRUARY 2016 Part 1: Commentary by Marshall Chasin: Perhaps the most well-read article of 2017 is “The effects of service-delivery model and purchase price on hearing-aid outcomes in older adults: a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial” by Larry Humes and his colleagues at Indiana State University, published in the March 2017…